Introduction to Types of Arduino

Introduction to Types of Arduino

The Arduino board is invented for the electronics students to use this in their projects. The Arduino boards are provided as open source that helps the user to build their projects and instruments according to their need. This electronic platform contains microcontrollers, connections, LEDs and many more. There are various types of Arduino boards present in the market that includes Arduino UNO, Red Board, LilyPad Arduino, Arduino Mega, Arduino Leonardo. All these Arduino boards are different in specifications, features and uses and are used in different type of electronics project

7 Different Types of Arduino

1. Arduino UNO

The Arduino Uno is an open-source microcontroller board based on the Microchip ATmega328P microcontroller and developed by Arduino.cc. The board is equipped with sets of digital and analog input/output (I/O) pins that may be interfaced to various expansion boards (shields) and other circuits.[1] The board has 14 digital I/O pins (six capable of PWM output), 6 analog I/O pins, and is programmable with the Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment), via a type B USB cable. It can be powered by the USB cable or by an external 9-volt battery, though it accepts voltages between 7 and 20 volts. It is similar to the Arduino Nano and Leonardo. The hardware reference design is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 2.5 license and is available on the Arduino website. Layout and production files for some versions of the hardware are also available. The word “uno” means “one” in Italian and was chosen to mark the initial release of Arduino Software. The Uno board is the first in a series of USB-based Arduino boards; it and version 1.0 of the Arduino IDE were the reference versions of Arduino, which have now evolved to newer releases. The ATmega328 on the board comes preprogrammed with a bootloader that allows uploading new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. While the Uno communicates using the original STK500 protocol, it differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it uses the Atmega16U2 (Atmega8U2 up to version R2) programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.

2. LilyPad Arduino

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller board designed for wearables and e-textiles. It can be sewn to fabric and similarly mounted power supplies, sensors and actuators with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V (the low-power version of the ATmega168) (datasheet) or the ATmega328V (datasheet).

Summary

Warning: Don’t power the LilyPad Arduino with more than 5.5 volts, or plug the power in backwards: you’ll kill it.

Microcontroller ATmega168V or ATmega328V

Operating Voltage 2.7-5.5 V

Input Voltage 2.7-5.5 V

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)

Analog Input Pins 6

DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA

Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)

SRAM 1 KB

EEPROM 512 bytes

Clock Speed 8 MHz

Clock Speed 8 MHz

 

Programming

The LilyPad Arduino can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). *Note*, the LilyPad Arduino should only be programmed with software versions 0010 or higher. You can program it with earlier versions, but all of the time related functions will be off (twice as slow as they should be).

The ATmega168V or ATmega328V on the Arduino LilyPad comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it with the Arduino software. You can also bypass the bootloader and program the ATmega through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details.

Power

The LilyPad Arduino can be powered via the USB connection or with an external power supply. If an external power supply is used, it should provide between 2.7 and 5.5 volts. This can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. Again, don’t power the LilyPad Arduino with more than 5.5 volts, or plug the power in backwards: you’ll kill it.

3. Arduino Mega

The Arduino Mega 2560 is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560 (datasheet). It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 14 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Mega is compatible with most shields designed for the Arduino Duemilanove or Diecimila.The Mega 2560 is an update to the Arduino Mega, which it replaces.

Summary

Microcontroller ATmega2560

Operating Voltage 5V

Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V

Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V

Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 14 provide PWM output)

Analog Input Pins 16

DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA

DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA

Flash Memory 256 KB of which 8 KB used by bootloader

SRAM 8 KB

EEPROM 4 KB

Clock Speed 16 MHz

Power

The Arduino Mega can be powered via the USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically.

External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board’s power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.

The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.

The Mega2560 differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it features the ATmega16U2 (ATmega8U2 in the revision 1 and revision 2 boards) programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.

Revision 2 of the Mega2560 board has a resistor pulling the 8U2 HWB line to ground, making it easier to put into DFU mode.

Revision 3 of the board has the following new features:

  • 0 pinout: added SDA and SCL pins that are near to the AREF pin and two other new pins placed near to the RESET pin, the IOREF that allow the shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. In future, shields will be compatible both with the board that use the AVR, which operate with 5V and with the Arduino Due that operate with 3.3V. The second one is a not connected pin, that is reserved for future purposes.
  • Stronger RESET circuit.
  • Atmega 16U2 replace the 8U2.

The power pins are as follows:

  • The input voltage to the Arduino board when it’s using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.
  • The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply.
  • A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA.
  • Ground pins.

Memory

The ATmega2560 has 256 KB of flash memory for storing code (of which 8 KB is used for the bootloader), 8 KB of SRAM and 4 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library).

Input and Output

Each of the 54 digital pins on the Mega can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

  • Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX); Serial 1: 19 (RX) and 18 (TX); Serial 2: 17 (RX) and 16 (TX); Serial 3: 15 (RX) and 14 (TX). Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data. Pins 0 and 1 are also connected to the corresponding pins of the ATmega16U2 USB-to-TTL Serial chip.
  • External Interrupts: 2 (interrupt 0), 3 (interrupt 1), 18 (interrupt 5), 19 (interrupt 4), 20 (interrupt 3), and 21 (interrupt 2). These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the attachInterrupt() function for details.
  • PWM: 0 to 13. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function.
  • SPI: 50 (MISO), 51 (MOSI), 52 (SCK), 53 (SS). These pins support SPI communication using the SPI library. The SPI pins are also broken out on the ICSP header, which is physically compatible with the Uno, Duemilanove and Diecimila.
  • LED: 13. There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it’s off.
  • TWI: 20 (SDA) and 21 (SCL). Support TWI communication using the Wire library. Note that these pins are not in the same location as the TWI pins on the Duemilanove or Diecimila.

The Mega2560 has 16 analog inputs, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and analogReference() function.

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

  • Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference().
  • Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block

Communication

The Arduino Mega2560 has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega2560 provides four hardware UARTs for TTL (5V) serial communication. An ATmega16U2 (ATmega 8U2 on the revision 1 and revision 2 boards) on the board channels one of these over USB and provides a virtual com port to software on the computer (Windows machines will need a .inf file, but OSX and Linux machines will recognize the board as a COM port automatically.

The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the ATmega8U2/ATmega16U2 chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1). A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on any of the Mega2560’s digital pins. The ATmega2560 also supports TWI and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the TWI bus; see the documentation for details. For SPI communication, use the SPI library.

Programming

The Arduino Mega can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). For details, see the reference and tutorials.

The ATmega2560 on the Arduino Mega comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the original STK500 protocol (reference, C header files).

You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details. The ATmega16U2 (or 8U2 in the rev1 and rev2 boards) firmware source code is available in the Arduino repository. The ATmega16U2/8U2 is loaded with a DFU bootloader, which can be activated by:

  • On Rev1 boards: connecting the solder jumper on the back of the board (near the map of Italy) and then resetting the 8U2.
  • On Rev2 or later boards: there is a resistor that pulling the 8U2/16U2 HWB line to ground, making it easier to put into DFU mode. You can then use Atmel’s FLIP software (Windows) or the DFU programmer (Mac OS X and Linux) to load a new firmware. Or you can use the ISP header with an external programmer (overwriting the DFU bootloader). See this user-contributed tutorial for more information.

4. Arduino Leonardo

Arduino Leonardo is a microcontroller board based on the Atmel ATmega32u4 Microcontroller. It offers 20 digital IOs (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. 

The ATmega32u4 MCU has built-in USB communication, eliminating the need for a secondary processor. This allows the Leonardo to appear to a connected computer as an HID, such as a mouse or keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port. The Leonardo board contains everything needed to support the microcontroller. Simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with an AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Microcontroller: ATmega32u4
  • Flash memory: 32Kb (4Kb used by bootloader)
  • SRAM: 2.5Kb 
  • EEPROM: 1Kb 
  • Operating voltage: 5V
  • Input voltage (recommended): 7V to 12V
  • Input voltage (limits): 6V to 20V
  • Digital I/O pins: 20
  • PWM channels: 7
  • Analog input channels: 12
  • DC current per I/O pin: 40mA
  • DC current for 3.3V pin: 50mA
  • Clock speed: 16MHz

5. Arduino Red Board

The RedBoard combines the simplicity of the UNO’s Optiboot bootloader (which is used in the Pro series), the stability of the FTDI (which we all missed after the Duemilanove was discontinued) and the R3 shield compatibility of the latest Arduino UNO R3. The RedBoard can be programmed over a USB Mini-B cable using the Arduino IDE: Just plug in the board, select “Arduino UNO” from the board menu and you’re ready to upload code.

At SparkFun we use many Arduinos and we’re always looking for the simplest, most stable one. Each board is a bit different and no one board has everything we want, so we decided to make our own version that combines all our favorite features. The SparkFun RedBoard combines the simplicity of the UNO’s Optiboot bootloader (which is used in the Pro series), the stability of the FTDI (which we all missed after the Duemilanove was discontinued) and the R3 shield compatibility of the latest Arduino UNO R3.

The RedBoard can be programmed over a USB Mini-B cable using the Arduino IDE: Just plug in the board, select “Arduino UNO” from the board menu and you’re ready to upload code. RedBoard has all of the hardware peripherals you know and love: 14 Digital I/O pins with 6 PWM pins, 6 Analog Inputs, UART, SPI and external interrupts. We’ve also broken out the SDA, SCL and IOREF pins that showed up on the UNO R3, so the RedBoard will be compatible with future shields. This version adds an SMD ISP header for use with shields.

You can power the RedBoard over USB or through the barrel jack. The on-board power regulator can handle anything from 7 to 15VDC. Check out the related items below for a compatible wall-wart power supply.

Specification

  • ATmega328 microcontroller with Optiboot (UNO) Bootloader
  • USB Programming Facilitated by the Ubiquitous FTDI FT231X
  • Input voltage – 7-15V
  • 0-5V outputs with 3.3V compatible inputs
  • 14 Digital I/O Pins (6 PWM outputs)
  • 6 Analog Inputs
  • ISP Header
  • 32k Flash Memory
  • 16MHz Clock Speed
  • All SMD Construction
  • R3 Shield Compatible
  • Red PCB!

 

6. Arduino NodeMCU

Node MCU

NodeMCU is a low-cost open source IoT platform.It initially included firmware which runs on the ESP8266 Wi-Fi SoC from Espressif Systems, and hardware which was based on the ESP-12 module. Later, support for the ESP32 32-bit MCU was added.

Specifications

  • Microcontroller: Tensilica 32-bit RISC CPU Xtensa LX106
  • Operating Voltage: 3.3V
  • Input Voltage: 7-12V
  • Digital I/O Pins (DIO): 16
  • Analog Input Pins (ADC): 1
  • UARTs: 1
  • SPIs: 1
  • I2Cs: 1
  • Flash Memory: 4 MB
  • SRAM: 64 KB
  • Clock Speed: 80 MHz
  • USB-TTL based on CP2102 is included onboard, Enabling Plug n Play
  • PCB Antenna
  • Small Sized module to fit smartly inside your IoT projects

7.Arduino Shields

Arduino shields are the boards, which are plugged over the Arduino board to expand its functionalities. There are different varieties of shields used for various tasks, such as Arduino motor shields, Arduino communication shields, etc.

Shield is defined as the hardware device that can be mounted over the board to increase the capabilities of the projects. It also makes our work easy. For example, Ethernet shields are used to connect the Arduino board to the Internet.

The pin position of the shields is similar to the Arduino boards. We can also connect the modules and sensors to the shields with the help of the connection cable. Arduino motor shields help us to control the motors with the Arduino board.

The advantages of using Arduino shields are listed below:

  • It adds new functionalities to the Arduino projects.
  • The shields can be attached and detached easily from the Arduino board. It does not require any complex wiring.
  • It is easy to connect the shields by mounting them over the Arduino board.
  • The hardware components on the shields can be easily implemented.
Types of Shields

The popular Arduino shields are listed below:

  • Ethernet shield
  • Xbee Shield
  • Proto shield
  • Relay shield
  • Motor shield
  • LCD shield
  • Bluetooth shield
  • Ethernet shield

  • The Ethernet shields are used to connect the Arduino board to the Internet. We need to mount the shield on the top of the specified Arduino board.
  • The USB port will play the usual role to upload sketches on the board.
  • The latest version of Ethernet shields consists of a micro SD card slot. The micro SD card slot can be interfaced with the help of the SD card library.
  • Xbee Shield

  • We can communicate wirelessly with the Arduino board by using the Xbee Shield with Zigbee.
  • It reduces the hassle of the cable, which makes Xbee a wireless communication model.
  • The Xbee wireless module allows us to communicate outdoor upto 300 feet and indoor upto 100 feet.
  • Proto shield

  • Proto shields are designed for custom circuits.
  • We can solder electronic circuits directly on the shield.
  • The shield consists of two LED pads, two power lines, and SPI signal pads.
  • The IOREF (Input Output voltage Reference) and GND (Ground) are the two power lines on the board.
  • We can also solder the SMD (Surface Mount Device) ICs on the prototyping area. A maximum of 24 pins can be integrated onto the SMD area.
  • Relay shield

  • The Arduino digital I/O pins cannot bear the high current due to its voltage and current limits. The relay shield is used to overcome such situation. It provides a solution for controlling the devices carrying high current and voltage.
  • The shield consists of four relays and four LED indicators.
  • It also provides NO/NC interfaces and a shield form factor for the simple connection to the Arduino board.
  • The LED indicators depicts the ON/OFF condition of each relay.
  • The relay used in the structure is of high quality.
  • The NO (Normally Open), NC (Normally Closed), and COM pins are present on each relay.
  • The applications of the Relay shield include remote control, etc.
  • Motor shield

  • The motor shield helps us to control the motor using the Arduino board.
    • It controls the direction and working speed of the motor. We can power the motor shield either by the external power supply through the input terminal or directly by the Arduino.
    • We can also measure the absorption current of each motor with the help of the motor shield.
    • The motor shield is based on the L298 chip that can drive a step motor or two DC motors. L298 chip is a full bridge IC. It also consists of the heat sinker, which increases the performance of the motor shield.
    • It can drive inductive loads, such as solenoids, etc.
    • The operating voltage is from 5V to 12V.
    • The applications of the motor shield are intelligent vehicles, micro-robots, etc.
  • LCD shield

  • The keypad of LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) shield includes five buttons called as up, down, left, right, and select.
  • There are 6 push buttons present on the shield that can be used as a custom menu control panel.
  • It consists of the 1602 white characters, which are displayed on the blue backlight LCD.
  • The LED present on the board indicates the power ON.
  • The five keys present on the board helps us to make the selection on menus and from board to our project.
      •  
  • Bluetooth shield

  • The Bluetooth shield can be used as a wireless module for transparent serial communication.
  • It includes a serial Bluetooth module. D0 and D1 are the serial hardware ports in the Bluetooth shield, which can be used to communicate with the two serial ports (from D0 to D7) of the Arduino board.
  • We can install Groves through the two serial ports of the Bluetooth shield called a Grove connector. One Grove connector is digital, while the other is analog.
  • The communication distance of the Bluetooth shield is upto 10m at home without any obstacle in between.
  •  
  • Capacitive Touchpad shield

  • It has a touchpad interface that allows to integrate the Arduino board with the touch shield.
  • The Capacitive touchpad shield consists of 12 sensitive touch buttons, which includes 3 electrode connections and 9 capacitive touch pads.
  • The capacitive shield is shown below:
  • The board can work with the logic level of 3.3V or 5V.
  • We can establish a connection to the Arduino project by touching the shield.

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